November: Lamprey River

6 July 2016 § 1 Comment

So I think after yesterday’s feedback, we’ve ruled out Flickr as a water-clip host. I also did some digging and found tutorials on how to get better quality uploads to Vine and YouTube. In the process, I found out how to place text on the videos then get the edited version from my computer to my phone for upload to Vine.

Vine:

YouTube:

Any new thoughts?

Testing: Lake Ossipee

5 July 2016 § 3 Comments

I’m feeling the urge to share some of my recent explorations of waterways, but I’m wondering about the best way to share them. Which video solution do you like best?

Vine seems to have poor resolution (even though my original is fine, even on my big computer screen), but it plays in a fun continuous loop and is easy to turn the sound on/off:

YouTube gives the full view (not cropped square like Vine) but seems to have poor resolution too, and then you also get the “next video” and ad things popping up:

Flickr seems to have the best resolution, though still not great. Plus its playback window is tiny and can’t be customized. However if you’re my friend on Flickr, you can go to the site and download the video to see it crisp and clean.

Lake Ossipee

Feedback? Opinions? Help!

BLUE [BLÁR]

18 August 2014 § 2 Comments

after repeatedly listening to Njörður P. Njarðvík’s baksneidd-braghendas in Icelandic for 90 minutes

Canada’s smoke
has curled around
the Cape and shifted

out to sea—
my spirit lifted

with each breath
the sky has gifted.

©2014 JS Graustein
Meredith, New Hampshire USA

click to zoom in on Flickr

click to zoom in on Flickr

Review: A History of the New Hampshire Abenaki

10 August 2014 § Leave a comment

A History of the New Hampshire Abenaki
A History of the New Hampshire Abenaki by Bruce D. Heald

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Dr. Heald’s book is on a topic that needs more attention than it gets. It is an overview of the first inhabitants of New Hampshire, introducing new inhabitants of the state to the history behind many of its place names. While transitions between topics is a bit rough at times, the bibliography was extensive enough to facilitate my further exploration of any topics that ended too abruptly. Dr. Heald tried to make the book an even-sided look at Abenaki history by interviewing tribal leaders and seeking out artifacts, attempting to balance out European written accounts; but due to the oral nature of historical Abenaki society, the majority of Dr. Heald’s historical source material was inevitably written by those of European descent and thus skewed the “Indian Warfare” and “Indian Legends and Folklore” chapters toward the white point of view. Nevertheless, this book was an enlightening read that introduced me to the first people and first language of my new home state.

PRODUCTION NOTE: While the cover is beautiful and the photos inside are really interesting, this book needs some SERIOUS proofreading and vetting.

View all my reviews

SMOKE [REYKUR]

26 July 2014 § 4 Comments

California light
in New England—
Canadian forests burn

©2014 JS Graustein
Meredith, New Hampshire USA

hoping the jet stream shifts soon

hoping the jet stream shifts soon

DISSONANCE [MIS-HLJÓMUR]

29 May 2014 § Leave a comment

Today

on Lake Winnepesauke

in Gold Country

local children play

my daughter plays

a band concert

on the MS Mount Washington—

in the high school theatre—

their introductory performance;

her farewell performance;

I am [not] there.

©2014 JS Graustein
Meredith, New Hampshire USA

Recorders, played with gusto.

Recorders, played with gusto.

CLOUD [SKÝ]

15 May 2014 § Leave a comment

I left home on a journey today: a road trip to visit family in Michigan. I expected my usual travel-adrenaline, the thrill of away. Instead I found dread at crossing the bridge that spans the Connecticut River and signifies the end of New Hampshire. To distract myself, I listened to the journey of Simon Armitage on the car stereo, the narrator’s voice like thunder through the mist on the Pennine Way. Similarly in Vermont, I wound along hairpin curves in cloud so thick I could barely see the hood of my car. Armitage dodged bulls in the fields he crossed; I dodged a family of Canada Geese [a mated pair plus five yellow-green goslings] as they attempted to cross I-90. And like Armitage, I lost my way. But only once. And only because I trusted (rather than overruled) technology. I’m halfway there; tomorrow the reunion begins, and hopefully with it joy. But for now, for tonight, I’ll sleep covered by the same bank of grey that reaches across New York, across Vermont, and blankets my Meredith meadow.

subaru crawls through cloud,
lines and signs all but invisible—
scenic overlook

©2014 JS Graustein
Rochester, New York USA

leaving home under a cloud

leaving home under a cloud

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