Subconscious Drive

20 December 2012 § 3 Comments

As I wrapped up the final book project for Folded Word’s 2012 list, I realized that my subconscious might be driving our paperback acquisitions. The last word of Guy Cranswick’s Nine Avenues (to be released by New Year’s Eve) is home. As is the last word of Mel Bosworth’s Freight (2011). Add to that the prevalence of homesickness and the redefinition of home that takes place in Smitha Murthy and Dorothee Lang’s Worlds Apart (2012) along with the analysis of childhood environs in Jessie Carty’s Paper House (2010) and you have the concept of home being central to every non-anthology paperback that Folded Word has published to-date.

Now I am a scientist by training (MS Biology 1995), so I understand that correlation does NOT equal causation. My search, whether conscious or subconscious, is not the only reasonable explanation for the prevalence of home in my print selections. Alternatives might be:

  • Home is a central concept for most humans, therefore it plays a key role in most manuscripts.
  • Being a competent writer requires a degree of “square peggedness” because the societal tension created by not fitting in allows a person to more objectively observe the world and its inhabitants, thereby creating a yearning to find a place to fit in (i.e. social/emotional home). The resultant observations form the basis of the conflicts that make written work interesting.
  • The appearance of home in these books is mere coincidence. Random. A fractal-like artifact of our chaotic submissions queue.
  • These books haven’t actually been about home at all, I just projected that onto them. [Any thoughts, my long-suffering authors?]

I’m not sure how aggressively to explore this. It’s difficult to design any kind of scientific analysis since there can be a 2-3 year lag between the time a submission is accepted and the book actually makes it into print. But I think it would be really interesting if, after the relocation issue is settled and I’m home (where/whatever that ends up being), Folded never publishes a home-centric book again.

I would love to hear alternate theories or support/rebuttal of the theories above. I’d also love to know if you’ve recently read any books that deal with the concept of home, or even if you are writing one yourself. The comments section below is ready and waiting for your input:-)

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kaleidescope view of FREIGHT’s final word

One Thing Leads to Another

6 September 2011 § 3 Comments

I’ve been hearing The Fixx in my head a lot lately because since spring, one thing has led to another and another and another. The combined effect has turned into a crazy backlog in the Folded Word publication calendar as well as a record total of 900 unanswered emails (and counting). The chain, you ask?

record rainfall>>killer allergies>>recurring illness>>finding allergist>>prescribed changes to the house>>moving/thinning furniture & figurines>>painting>>temporary storage of overflow in my office

Even though I’ve thrown out 4 huge bags of trash, filled my trunk with items for Goodwill, and culled 10 boxes of books to be re-distributed, the overflow in my office looks like this:

Could you work in this?

Somehow I’ve got to dig out my guillotine so that I can launch Ben Nardolilli’s chapbook. I also need to prep for the talk I’m giving at Surprise Valley Writers Conference. Anyone have a spare shovel?

 

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