Alliterative Mock-Quiche

12 February 2015 § 2 Comments

a mini version made in a springform pan

a mini version made in a springform pan

Add barley flakes to boiling broth and cover.
Simmer — standing by to stir — for a quarter-hour.
Prepare a pie plate with some oil
then flatten the flakes to form a crust.
Add cod and kale (cooked ahead)
then whisk ricotta, water, and eggs.
Season with salt and a smidge of pepper.
Pour this potion atop the crust
so it fills all fissures ‘mongst flake and leaf.
Place the pie in a pre-heated oven:
four-twenty-five for fifteen minutes
three-fifty for a further hour.
Let it alone to lose some heat
then slide slices off spatula with a knife
(’twill keep the cod from coming off the grain).
Nutritious? Yes. Tasty? No.
Truthfully told, it’s bland.
But fair fare will suffice for now —
with a chaser of chocolate cookie.

Maple BBQ

4 February 2015 § Leave a comment

I should have posted this recipe sooner. After all, I’ve been serving it to dinner guests since Thanksgiving. It took until now, though, for me to photograph it served on anything that looked remotely appetizing. It wouldn’t have been fair for me to post a photo of a LEAP-friendly recipe served on a chemical-filled bun. Yesterday I tried a half slice of clean sourdough toast for the first time, so I used the opportunity to grab a shot. Et voilà! It’s now time to share:-)

Maple BBQ Beef on Sourdough Toast

Maple BBQ Beef on Sourdough Toast

PART I: SHREDDED ROAST/POULTRY

Ingredients:

  • 1 roast of allowed meat OR assorted pieces of allowed poultry (skin-on, bone-in is fine)
  • 1 T allowed oil (roast only)
  • salt and black pepper to taste

Directions for roast:

  1. In a large fry pan, sear all sides of the roast in the oil. Use two meat forks to help manipulate the roast when searing the sides.
  2. Place the roast in a large crockpot and sprinkle the top with salt and pepper.
  3. If cooking the night before you plan to eat it, put the lid on the crockpot and set it to low. Cook overnight. If cooking the day you plan to eat it, put the lid on the crockpot and set it to high. Cook 2-3 hours on high (depending on size of the roast), then turn the roast over and cook an additional 2-3 hours on low.
  4. The meat is done when you can easily pull small pieces off with a fork.
  5. Pull the meat out of the crockpot and set in a large bowl. Discard any string or bone that came with the roast.
  6. Use two forks (one in each hand) to shred the meat. (Pierce the roast with both forks together, then pull the forks in opposite directions. The meat should practically fall apart in shreds.) Repeat until the whole roast is shredded.
  7. Discard any gristle, fat, veins, etc. that get uncovered while shredding.
  8. When the entire roast is shredded, cover the bowl to keep the meat from drying out.
  9. Refrigerate if not using right away.

Directions for poultry:

  1. Place the pieces in a crockpot that will fit them comfortably. Sprinkle them with salt and pepper.
  2. If cooking the night before you plan to eat it, put the lid on the crockpot and set it to low. Cook overnight. If cooking the day you plan to eat it, put the lid on the crockpot and set it to high. Cook 2 hours on high, then rearrange the pieces (so the top ones are at the bottom) and cook an additional 1.5-2 hours on low (depending on quantity and size of pieces).
  3. The poultry is done when it is falling off the bone and you can easily pull small pieces off with a fork.
  4. Pull the poultry out of the crockpot and set in a large bowl. Discard bones and skin.
  5. Use two forks (one in each hand) to shred the poultry. (Pierce each piece with both forks together, then pull the forks in opposite directions. The piece should practically fall apart in shreds.) Repeat until all the pieces are shredded.
  6. Discard any fat, veins, etc. that get uncovered while shredding.
  7. When all the pieces are shredded, cover the bowl to keep the poultry from drying out.
  8. Refrigerate if not using right away.

 
PART II: MAPLE BBQ SAUCE

Ingredients:

  • 1 box Pomi tomato sauce (or 2 c  other clean tomato sauce with no additives)
  • ¼ c maple syrup
  • ¼ c apple cider vinegar
  • ¼ t black pepper
  • 1 t salt

Directions:

  1. In a medium pot over medium heat, combine all ingredients. Stir well. Cover pot with a splatter screen.
  2. Bring to a low boil, then turn the heat down to low.
  3. Simmer for at least an hour, stirring occasionally, until sauce is desired thickness.
  4. If not using right away, pour sauce into a canning jar and screw the lid on while it’s still warm. After it cools, store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

 
PART III: COMBINE & SERVE

Crockpot: (Recommended)

  • If the meat is freshly shredded and the sauce is freshly made, mix the sauce in with the meat and cook on “warm” for 30 minutes.
  • If shredded meat was stored in the fridge, mix the sauce in with the meat and cook on “low” for 60 minutes.

Stovetop:

  • If the meat is freshly shredded and the sauce is freshly made, mix the sauce in with the meat and cook on the lowest heat setting for 10 minutes. Be careful not to let the sugars in the sauce burn.
  • If shredded meat was stored in the fridge, mix the sauce in with the meat and cook on the lowest heat setting for 30 minutes. Be careful not to let the sugars in the sauce burn.

Serve on top of buns, toast, baked sweet potato, or anything else you like. Consider adding a slice of cheese if allowed. (Mmmm, I miss cheese.) Diced or sliced tomatoes work, too.

 

The Mustard Freeze – or LEAP Phase Limbo

13 January 2015 § 2 Comments

My food list is frozen, like my window on a -23C morning.

My food list is frozen, like my window on a -23C morning.

After three painful and frustrating weeks in Phase 5 capped off with a mysterious reaction to mustard (i.e. not allergic nor enzyme related), my dietician put the process on hold. I’d only managed to add one food in Phase 5 and even that was iffy. I also noticed a correlation between my hormonal cycle and whether or not I would react to a new food. NOT helpful. Thus the plan for the next four weeks is to stick to safe foods so my body can rest.

BUT. The last few days I’ve been having reactions to what I thought were safe foods and supplements. Going in to this rest-stop I had 44 foods/ingredients/beverages plus 3 vitamin/mineral supplements. If my analysis of my symptoms since Friday is correct, I am now down to no vitamin supplements and only 41 foods. I’m hoping to add a few back if my body can truly be calm for two weeks straight. I’m also hoping to work again now that I won’t be throwing monkey wrenches into my system every 36-48 hours.

Stress-management was also suggested, since stress can cause the immune system and digestive system to go haywire. I definitely don’t need that kind of help right now. Fortunately it’s winter, so I can distract myself with snow photography — one of my favorite subjects. I also have a stack of Christmas books waiting for me to sit and be still.

At least I’ve lost another pound (23 total). Yay?

~

At 22 Pounds Lost

5 January 2015 § Leave a comment

image

loving my “new” old clothes

 

A box of clothes that once I wore
reopened in our basement store:
With much weight lost I now reclaim
ten tops, some jeans, then lose the blame
I’d taken on before I’d found
the cause of all my excess pounds.

~

Love/Hate – or LEAP Phase 3/4

16 December 2014 § 2 Comments

Thank God for tea.

Thank God for tea.

Phases 3-4 were only 7 days apiece since I didn’t have any allergic reactions (YAY!). I did, however, have some pretty nasty enzyme-related issues; the last one was so bad I went back to only Phase 1-2 foods for 48 hours.

I love that I get to have tea again, but hate how wired just a half cup makes me. I love that I get to have chocolate again, but hate that I can no longer eat chickpeas (i.e. socca & hummus). I love that the ale yeast Harpoon uses in their hard cider doesn’t mess me up, but hate that the baker’s yeast Wasa uses in their sourdough rye crackers does. In other words, I love the anticipation of trying a new food, but hate the disappointment when one doesn’t work out…

…especially when the bad reaction is completely unexpected. Like cashews. 48 hours later and I’m still nauseous.

The lists of Phases 3 & 4 foods were so short that I’m grouping them together below. In addition to the foods from Phase 1 & Phase 2, my list now looks like this:

  • string beans
  • chickpeas (enzyme problem)
  • cocoa
  • pistachio nuts
  • basil
  • tea
  • cashews (enzyme problem)

Going forward, I hate that I’ll have to hold off on Phase 5 until I’m back to rights; I’m hoping it will be worth the wait. But even with all the hiccups in Phases 3-4, I do love that I’ve lost another 2.5 pounds:-)

Calming Down – or LEAP Phase 2

9 December 2014 § 3 Comments

Like this photo?

Trees Drawn by Ice

It’s a pattern the ice made on my front steps last week. I think it looks like a leafless maple surrounded by ice-bent pines. I took it with my DSLR + macro lens — the macro lens I hadn’t been able to use in 13 months because I couldn’t hold still enough to get crisp detail on tiny subjects. Until now.

That’s right: by the end of LEAP Phase 2, my as-yet-unexplained tremors vanished. Neither my dietician nor I expected the diet to eliminate them. (We had hoped it might calm them a little once my body was less stressed in general.) By the end of October they’d gotten so bad that I had to carry around a folding cane just in case I got wobbly while out and about. I’d also stopped playing the bass, doing calligraphy, and hand-binding books because my hands were no longer coordinated enough. There were even days I couldn’t type. Now I’m back.

I did have to stay in Phase 2 for 2.5 weeks because I continued to have allergic reactions to some of the challenge foods. The extra time was worth it, though, since my tremors left AND:

  • I lost 6 more pounds (total of 14).
  • My hearing improved because my ears drained.
  • My blood sugar stabilized.
  • I can now tolerate some raw fruits and veggies.

The biggest blessing of Phase 2 was getting olive oil back. Ghee was really messing with my gall bladder. Plus baking is much easier now that I can just pour some oil in the batter and stir, rather than bringing eggs to room temperature so they don’t re-solidify the ghee before mixing is complete. So now in addition to my Phase 1 foods, my Phase 2 list looks like this:

    • salmon
    • shrimp
    • chicken (allergic)
    • rye
    • barley
    • spelt (allergic)
    • tomato
    • cranberry
    • apple
    • sunflower seeds (allergic)
    • maple
    • leek
    • mint
    • cane sugar & molasses
    • yeast (enzyme problem)
    • olive oil

My combined list of foods is finally long enough to cook some things my whole family will eat. Like waffles. And BBQ beef (I’ll share the recipe this week). Still, I’m REALLY looking forward to Phase 4 when I can try TEA again:-)

LEAP Waffles

7 December 2014 § Leave a comment

I am finally developing some recipes that my son and husband will eat. It definitely helps when I’m not having to cook two meals simultaneously! Here’s a basic recipe for waffles that has been pretty flexible. So far I’ve made it with two different combinations of flour blends, oils, and sweeteners:

  • Phase 1 = buckwheat & quinoa flour, ghee, beet sugar
  • Phase 2 = barley & rye flour, extra light olive oil, maple syrup

If you use barley & rye flours, be sure to set your waffle maker on a higher setting because they stay wet longer than when cooking with wheat flour.

Mmmm. Waffles:-)

Mmmm. Waffles:-)

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 baked sweet potato (cold left-overs work great)
  • filtered water
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 3 T. allowed oil
  • 2 t. allowed sweetener
  • 1/2 t. salt
  • 1 c. allowed flour #1
  • 1/2 c. allowed flour #2
  • 1 t. baking soda

Directions:

  1. In a large (6 or 8 cup) measuring bowl, mash sweet potato with a fork. Add enough water to make 1.5 cups. Mix the water and sweet potato together with the fork.
  2. Add the eggs and lemon juice. Stir.
  3. Before adding anything else to the mix, plug in your waffle iron to preheat it.
  4. Add oil, sweetener, and salt to the mix. Stir.
  5. Add both flours and baking soda. Stir.
  6. Add additional water as needed for batter to be pourable, but not too thin.
  7. Ladle the batter onto the waffle iron and cook. Waffles should be crisp on the outside, but not rock-hard.
  8. Top the waffles with anything you’re allowed to have. (I’ve even used these as sandwich bread.) Make the waffles more enjoyable for non-LEAPers by providing their favorite toppings.
  9. Leftover waffles can be stored in the fridge or freezer and then reheated in a toaster.
  10. Makes 8-10 medium-sized round waffles.

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